Diploma of Health Science

Get your first taste of the science behind complementary medicine.

The Diploma of Health Science will help you take your first steps in the world of complementary medicine. If you’re fascinated by health and love helping others to be their best selves, the Diploma of Health Science will bring that passion to life. This course equips you with the foundational knowledge and skills needed for launching a career in Health.

This course can also lead to further study in a range of Professional health disciplines such as Naturopathy, Clinical or Non-Clinical Nutrition, Western Herbal Medicine, Public Health and Physical Therapies through enrolling in the relevant linked degree pathways.

CRICOS CODE
084580B

What you'll learn:

Course Delivery

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Workload and Assessment

Typical assessment includes:

Each subject you complete includes 3 assessments on average. Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include quizzes, written assignments, presentation, reflective journal, case analysis, literature review and practical exams

Subject Information

Human Structure & Physiology 2 will further develop knowledge of the structure and physiology of the human body with special attention given to the integration of human systems and beginning to explore the impact of disturbances in Homeostasis and disruption of normal function. The structure and function of the lymphatic, immune, digestive, nervous, endocrine, urinary, reproductive systems and the special senses are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body. This subject builds on the knowledge and understandings of human structure and physiology, provides the foundation to look at disease, disorders and syndromes and their pathophysiology, in later subjects.

Evidence-based practice is an essential component of the exercise of clinical judgement in the delivery of quality healthcare. Students will also gain an understanding of how research evidence is translated into practice. This subject provides students with an introduction to health informatics, research and digital literacy, critical thinking and evidence-based practice. Students are guided through the skills necessary to locate, critique and interpret a research article for application to their practice. They will become familiar with quantitative and qualitative evidence, research methodology, basic descriptive and inferential statistics and the foundational skills to be able to evaluate and appraise evidence in healthcare research.

Human Structure & Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. This subject will build on the biological foundations by exploring the interaction and organisation of cells, tissues and organs which forms a basis to study the physiological integration of key body systems. The maintenance and regulation of the internal environment by homeostasis at a system level will be key to students understanding disruption and disease in later subjects. Key physiological and functional processes such as movement, metabolism, oxygenation and protection will be discussed, with body systems including the integumentary, musculoskeletal, respiratory and cardiovascular system the focus of this subject. This subject will provide the first part of an evidence based foundational knowledge of human physiology to guide health practice.

Biological Foundations explores the biological building blocks which make up the human body from the chemical level up to the cellular level. These essential chemistry concepts will assist with building relevant links to the study of human physiology in later subjects. The subject then explores the foundational studies in biochemistry which includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, proteins, enzymes, lipids, DNA and RNA. The concepts of gene expression and regulation are discussed in addition to the cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane. The study of the biology of the human cell concludes this subject and upon completion equips students to commence study at the tissue level of structure and physiology subjects.

This subject provides students an introduction to the diversity of health theories and initiatives to improve health outcomes. Students will engage with key concepts including human right to health, social determinants of health, equality, equity, and vulnerability. An introduction to Australia’s health system and intersectoral action will also be provided.

Complementary Medicine Foundations introduces the historical and conceptual emergence of Naturopathy and Western Herbal Medicine and how this underpins contemporary clinical practice in Australia and globally. It specifically focuses on professional practice: introducing the therapeutic model, the underlying theoretical and philosophical concepts, and discusses the differences between various approaches to the health-disease-healing process. Students will be introduced to the local regulatory environment of the complementary medicine professions within the context of their career outcome and best practice. This subject introduces key concepts regarding ethics and communication in therapeutic relationships.

Within this introductory subject, students learn the principles and practice of public health and improving the health of populations. Students learn how public health is defined, the origins of public health and its evolution as a discipline. Students learn the key principles of the ‘new public health’, public health practice, the functions of public health, the role of government in improving the health and wellbeing of citizens, and public health service models, including comprehensive primary health care. They consider different understandings of health and illness, including professional, lay and Australian Indigenous definitions. They are introduced to key concepts in public health, including a human rights approach to health, an ecological perspective and the social determinants of health.

Counselling & Communication Skills encompasses counselling skills commonly needed by health professionals for effective communication. This subject comprises a practical approach to a variety of communication skills and best practice strategies including promoting change, compliance, obstacles to change, transition and self-care. Sessions facilitate the development of effective listening and responding skills, increased personal awareness and insight in order to assist the building of a professional relationship for interactions with clients, colleagues and members of the community.

In this subject students will develop their understanding of disease processes and review evidence-based strategies to reduce the risk of disease and maintain health. Students will develop knowledge to apply educational and environmental interventions based upon risk factors associated with the development and chronicity of disease.

In Herbal Manufacturing students are familiarized with different forms of herbal preparations exploring the definition, herbs used, manufacturing techniques, preservation and application. This information is applied in compulsory laboratory sessions where students are immersed in the practical aspects of herbal medicine making. Students are introduced to the requirements of working in a professional herbal medicine dispensary. Students are also introduced to the commercial regulatory environment including manufacturing and distribution requirements of herbal medicines in Australia.

Botany introduces students to the study of plant structure and function. Plant taxonomy, nomenclature, classification and identification will be discussed with special regard and relevance for the study of naturopathy and western herbal medicine. Students will be introduced to selected medicinal plants as examples of key plant families, relevant cultivation and conservation considerations.

Food Science, Systems and Policy (NUTR2004) examines the way in which food is produced, processed and distributed in Australia and globally. It provides students with an understanding of current practices and trends in primary production and food manufacturing and distribution. It also examines the laws governing food for sale and the politics of the food system and how these impact on public health initiatives as they relate to food security, sustainability and food deserts.

This subject introduces the concept of digital fluency in a higher educational context. Students will study the relevant resources and explore strategies and techniques to allow full participation in their new academic environment. The subject will embrace research skills and deploy technology to develop the knowledge, ethical frameworks and self-confidence needed to participate fully in contemporary culture. The subject introduces the proficiencies for integrating knowledge from multiple sources, for thinking critically about widely available information, and for participating collaboratively in the communication that information technologies enable.

In this subject students will examine the range of nutritional requirements that impact populations, communities and individuals at particular life stages including pre-conception, pregnancy, during lactation, infant, toddler, adolescent, adult and geriatric populations, as well as the specific issues affecting indigenous communities.

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the micronutrients which includes water- and fat-soluble vitamins and minerals and how these relate to human metabolism. This subject provides students with underpinning knowledge in relation to the correlation that exists between micronutrients and human physiology. Each individual micronutrient is studied in regard to structure, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake and therapeutic doses. Also included are factors contributing to, and symptoms associated with, states of excess, insufficiency and deficiency.

In this subject, students undertake a detailed and in-depth study of the macronutrients, protein, carbohydrates and lipids, and how these relate to human metabolism. Each individual macronutrient is studied in regards to their composition, biological function, dietary sources, recommended daily intake, factors contributing to excess states, and states of insufficiency and deficiency; and signs and symptoms associated with nutrient imbalances found in individuals and populations. Students will investigate how the management of these macronutrients contribute to the public health agenda.