BHSc Clinical Myotherapy Mission Statement

Persistent pain is a leading cause of long-term disability in the western world, affecting more people than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined. It decreases quality of life, increases sickness absence, and compromises wellbeing in a growing proportion of our society, placing a significant burden on local and global communities.

Providing access to treatment, promoting physical activity, and education to understand their pain in a biopsychosocial framework are key solutions to these problems.

Through high quality health education, Clinical Myotherapists have a sound understanding of human structure and function to apply evidenced based assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions. Clinical Myotherapists are part of the solution for individuals and the community.

“Clinical Myotherapists support better musculoskeletal health”

Myotherapy is considered to be the evidence base assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions (Myotherapy Association Australia, 2018). The term ‘Myotherapy’ comes from the Greek word ‘myo’ or ‘muscle’, and Clinical Myotherapy is now a system of healthcare that focuses on the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal pain (pain in the muscles, nerves and joints). Its methods of physical and orthopaedic assessment share some similarities with other manual therapy disciplines such as Physiotherapy and Osteopathy. However, Clinical Myotherapy can have greater reliance on physical soft tissue treatment methods that accompany a complete treatment plan.  There is also a strong focus on working in a clinical setting, an aspect of this degree that many Myotherapy students enjoy.

By assessing the movement, contraction and function of the muscles, nerves and joints, Clinical Myotherapists are able to treat complaints and prescribe pain management and rehabilitation regimes that are tailored to individual patient needs. Clinical Myotherapy differentiates itself from other Myotherapy qualifications by its focus on in-depth scientific underpinnings and its evidence-based approach to clinical practice.  This higher-level learning allows for a broader perspective of the clinical picture and enables clinical diagnoses and treatment to be more focused for effective patient outcomes.  It also provides opportunities for academic development in post-graduate areas, with many students choosing to onto post-graduate pain management and physiotherapy qualifications.

This three-year degree is approved by TEQSA (Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency) the National Australian accreditation body for Higher Education providers.

To see Think Education’s policies in relation to refunds, deferment, suspension and cancellation of enrolment, please refer to our website: http://www.think.edu.au/studying-at-think/policies-and-procedures

Course Overview

Qualification Title BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (CLINICAL MYOTHERAPY)
Study Options – Domestic Australian students Full-time or part time on campus. Study Options – Domestic Australian students Full-time or part time on campus.
Start Dates February, June, September

For specific dates visit the website

Start Dates February, June, September

For specific dates visit the website

Payment Options – Domestic Australian students

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses.

Further information within this Course Information Sheet

It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold ($54,869 in 2016-17). Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Payment Options – International students

Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date.

Course study requirements Full Time: 3 years

Part Time: 6 years

Full time = 3 x 12 week trimesters per year, including examinations.

Part time = 6 x 12 week trimesters  (over two years)

Study load:

Full time = 4 x 3hr classes per week plus self-study hours. Total of 40hrs per week.

Part time = 2 x 3hr classes per week plus self-study. Total of 20hrs per week.

Assessment Each subject you complete includes 3 assessments on average. Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include quizzes, written assignments, presentation, reflective journal, case analysis, literature review, practical exams and written exams.
Location Fitzroy Campus Delivered by Southern School of Natural Therapies (SSNT)
Provider Think: Colleges Pty Ltd is registered as a self-accrediting Australian organisation by the Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA). CRICOS Course code 084579F
Provider obligations Think: Colleges Pty Ltd is responsible for all aspects of the student experience, including the quality of course delivery, in compliance with the Higher Education Standards 2015 Accrediting body Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
Course Fees        For details, refer to the website Any other fees For details, refer to the website

 

Admission Criteria
Applicants with higher education study ·       A completed higher education qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another accredited higher education provider

OR

·       Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 6 (Associate Degree) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another accredited higher education provider

Applicants with vocational education and training (VET) study ·       A completed vocational education qualification at AQF level 4 (Certificate IV) or above, or equivalent, from a registered training organisation (RTO)

OR

·       Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 5 (Diploma) or above, or equivalent, at a registered training organisation (RTO)

Applicants with work and life experience Demonstrated ability to undertake study at the required level:

·        broadly relevant work experience (documented e.g. CV), demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR

·        formal, informal or non-formal study, completed or partially completed, demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR

·        written submission to demonstrate reasonable prospect of success.

Applicants with recent secondary education (within the past two years) with ATAR or equivalent

(for applicants who will be selected wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR)

Year 12 or equivalent with ATAR 60
English Language Proficiency

(applicable to international students, and in addition to academic or special entry requirements noted above)

International Students

Equivalent IELTS 6.5 (Academic) with no skills band less than 5.5

Special Entry:

Applicants in any category whose study, work or life experiences have been impacted by disability, illness or family disruption will be given special consideration for admission. Each application will be considered on its merit, based on the evidence supplied by the applicant attesting to the circumstances of the applicant. Applicants for special entry may need to complete written or numerical tasks to assist with assessing eligibility for admission.

Advanced standing/academic credit/recognition of prior learning (RPL)

You may be entitled to credit for prior learning, whether formal or informal. Formal learning can include previous study in higher education, vocational education, or adult and community education. Informal learning can include on the job learning or various kinds of work and life experience. Credit can reduce the amount of study needed to complete a degree.

Applicants admitted based on prior higher education study may be eligible for Advanced Standing in the form of credit and/or recognition of prior learning (RPL) under the Torrens University Australia Credit Policy.

* Students with completed subjects may be eligible for specified credit and/or elective exemptions

* Students who have completed a qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above may be eligible for block credit (where a block credit agreement exists)

* Students with a mix of formal study and informal and/or non-formal learning may be eligible for recognition of prior learning in addition to any credit approved.

Credit will not be applied automatically. Applicants must apply for credit and/or RPL as early as possible prior to each study period, with applications not accepted after week 2. For further information about credit and recognition of prior learning please see /courses/course-credit

Where to get further information:

Torrens University:  Torrens University is Australia’s global university and offers courses including business, design, hospitality, education and more!

Universities Admissions Centre (UAC): Explore your options, apply for courses and receive offers for tertiary study in NSW & the ACT.

Australian Tertiary Admissions Centres (TACs): manage the usual process of student university applications and the study offer rounds on behalf of the particular universities that they cover. All TACs are independent of each other, so depending on which state or the number of universities you want to submit an application to, you may need to apply through multiple TACs. We’ve provided links below to the various TACs.

Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT): With QILT, you can do side by side comparisons of the quality of the higher education institutions and the study areas that you’re interested in.

ATAR profile for those offered places wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR in [T1 2018]

 

(ATAR-based offers only, across all offer rounds)

ATAR (OP in QLD)
(Excluding adjustment factors) *
Highest rank to receive an offer N/P
Median rank to receive an offer N/P
Lowest rank to receive an offer N/P

Notes:  * L/N – indicates low numbers if less than 5 ATAR-based offers made

# N/P – indicates figure is not published if less than 25 ATAR-based offers made

Student profile:

The table below gives an indication of the likely peer cohort for new students at the institution. It provides data on students that commenced undergraduate study and passed the census date in the most relevant recent intake period for which data are available, including those admitted through all offer rounds and international students studying in Australia

Applicant background Semester one / Full year intake [T1 2018]
Number of students Percentage of all students
(A) Higher education study
(includes a bridging or enabling course)
<5 N/P
(B) Vocational education and training (VET) study 20 65%
(C) Recent secondary education:

·        Admitted solely on the basis of ATAR
(regardless of whether this includes the impact of
adjustment factors such as equity or subject bonus points)

6
·        Admitted where both ATAR and additional criteria were considered
(e.g. portfolio, audition, extra test, early offer conditional on minimum ATAR)
0 N/P
·        Admitted on the basis of other criteria only and ATAR was not a factor
(e.g. special consideration, audition alone, schools recommendation scheme with no minimum ATAR requirement)
0 N/P
(D) Work and life experience
(Admitted on the basis of previous achievement other than the above)
<2 N/P
International students <5 N/P
All students 31 100.0%

Notes:       “<5” – the number of students is less than 5.

N/A – Students not accepted in this category.

N/P – Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

Course Structure – Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy)

Year 1 Trimester 1 BHS101A BHS102A BHS103A CMY101A Clinical Industry Placement 1 (80hrs required)
Anatomy & Physiology 1 Bioscience Counselling & Communication Skills Myotherapy History & Foundations
Trimester 2 BHS104A BHS105A CMY102A CMY103A
Anatomy & Physiology 2 Biochemistry 1 Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1 Neuromuscular Techniques
Trimester 3 BHS107A CMY104A CMY105A CMY106A
Research & Evidence-Based Practice Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 1 Clinical Assessment 1 Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2
Year 2 Trimester 4 BHS201A CMY201A CMY202A CMY203A Clinical Industry Placement 2

(100hrs required)

General Pathology Neuroscience & Motor Control Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 2 Clinical Assessment 2
Trimester 5 CMY212A CMY205A CMY206A CMY207A
Clinical Assessment 3 Biomechanics & Kinesiology Myofascial Dry Needling 1 Pain Management 1
Trimester 6 CMY204B CMY209A CMY210A CMY211A
Musculoskeletal Pathology Exercise Prescription 1 Myofascial Dry Needling 2 Pain Management 2
Year 3 Trimester 7 BHS303A

Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology

CMY311A

Joint Mobilisation

Elective CMY303A

Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 1

Clinical Industry Placement 3

(120hrs required)

Trimester 8 CMY304A

Exercise Prescription 2

CMY306A

Pain Management 3

Elective CMY307A

Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 2

Trimester 9 BHS401A
Professional Practice
CMY305A

Critical Literature Review

CMY309A

Neuropsychology

CMY310A

Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 3

Yr 3 Electives CMY301A

Lifespan Myotherapy

FHN201

Foundations of Human Nutrition

CMY312A

Sports Injury Management

HWEL2009

Active Ageing and Falls Prevention

HWEL2010

Corporate Health

SEN301

Social Enterprise

*Elective options are subject to availability

Course Rules

Subjects are listed below by subject code please refer to Course Structure (above) for delivery pattern. Please note these subject descriptions are subject to change.

To graduate from the course, a student must successfully complete 36 subjects. Each has a value of 10 credit points. A full time student will complete 120 credit points per year for 3 years for a total of 360 credit points. There are 8 core Health Science subjects (80 credit points) + 26 other core subject + two electives.

Students are also required to complete 300 Clinical Industry Placement hours. A total of 80hrs must be completed by start of the 2nd year subjects, 180 by the start of the 3rd year subjects, and 300 in order to graduate.

Each subject includes 4 hours of teaching (e.g. classroom hours, tutorials, group work, online activities) and approximately 6 hours of self-directed study per week, totalling 10 hours of study per week per subject enrolled in.

Subjects

Subject details Subject Availability
Online Melbourne Campus
BHS101A Anatomy & Physiology 1

Anatomy and Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. The interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis is covered in detail. In addition, this subject covers the structure and function of cells and epithelial tissue, the internal structural anatomy of the human body and the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary health practitioners, as it enables them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains this balance.

Yes Yes
BHS102A Bioscience

Bioscience provides a foundational knowledge for further studies in anatomy and physiology, clinical nutrition, biochemistry and pharmacology. It comprises the study of relevant concepts of general, physical and organic chemistry and includes atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical compound structure, nomenclature, behaviour and bonding as well as organic compounds and their basic properties and reactions.

Bioscience (BHS102A) is a crucial component of the modern healthcare practitioner’s education in order to provide the basic building blocks for structural and therapeutic knowledge.

Yes Yes
BHS103A Counselling & Communication Skills

Counselling & Communication Skills encompasses counselling skills commonly needed by complementary and alternative healthcare practitioners. This subject comprises a practical approach to a variety of communication skills and strategies including promoting change, compliance, obstacles to change, transition and self-care.  Sessions facilitate the development of effective listening and responding skills, increased personal awareness and insight in order to assist the building of a therapeutic relationship.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary healthcare practitioners, as it enables them to understand and put into use communication skills essential for building a therapeutic relationship in practice and supporting clients through change.

Yes Yes
CMY101A Myotherapy History & Foundations

This subject studies the history of manual therapy and clinical myotherapy in Australia. Palpatory skills, thermal therapy, postural assessment and muscle management are introduced with attention to the comfort and safety of the patient and practitioner. WH&S and Healthcare law and ethics are introduced at a foundational level to complement the introduction to manual therapies and the initiation of industry placements.

  Yes
BHS104A Anatomy & Physiology 2

Anatomy and Physiology 2 builds and expands on the information and skills learnt in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A). This subject continues to investigate the structure and function of the human body with special attention given to the interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis. The structure and function of the respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic and special senses systems are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body.

The study of Anatomy and Physiology 2 (BHS104A) is vital in the education of healthcare practitioners to enable them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains balance.

Yes Yes
BHS105A Biochemistry 1

Biochemistry 1 is a core subject that builds upon the basic chemistry principles covered in Bioscience (BHS102A).  It comprises an introduction to the basic biochemical compounds in the body. This subject includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids and nucleic acid, DNA and RNA.  The concept of gene expression and regulation is discussed in addition to cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane.

This subject provides a vital foundation for the complementary healthcare practitioner in the basic macromolecules essential for life.  This knowledge will be built upon and expanded on in Biochemistry 2 (BHS202A) and further therapeutic subjects. In the Bachelor of Health Science (Naturopathy and Nutritional Medicine), this is also built upon in Nutritional Biochemistry (CAM205A).

Yes Yes
CMY102A Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the upper body that is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A).  This subject introduces students to the musculoskeletal components of the human body in a theoretical and practical setting, and comprises the study of the axial and appendicular skeleton (upper limb), nervous system, cervical and thoracic spine, head, and shoulder.  A practical component of this subject will incorporate anatomy wet labs where available, so that students can examine specimens of tissues and regions of the body.  Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

  Yes
CMY103A Neuromuscular Techniques

A practical subject that covers a variety of soft tissue mobilisation methods including massage, myofascial release (MFR), cupping, muscle energy technique (MET), neuromuscular techniques and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching.  Students will practise techniques on each other in the clinical classroom and under close supervision.

  Yes
BHS107A Research & Evidence-Based Practice

Research & Evidence Based Practice provides essential knowledge in research methods and research article evaluation for complementary medicine students. This subject introduces the fundamentals of research practice and methods for the natural therapies including research design, methodology, analysis and basic statistical skills. This subject provides the student with the proficiency to be able to appropriately read, analyse and evaluate current healthcare research.

Yes Yes
CMY104A Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 1

Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 1 introduces the student to the palpation techniques used to identify specific muscles and their trigger points and referred pain patterns, preparing the student for myofascial dry needling.  Students work in pairs to locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the upper body and limbs.  Due to the practical nature of this class, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

  Yes
CMY105A Clinical Assessment 1

Clinical Assessment 1 (CMY105A) will provide the student with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to perform a comprehensive musculoskeletal and neurological assessment of the upper body.  These skills are important to the practising Clinical Myotherapist as they essentially underpin the clinical reasoning of a consultation process.  Students work in pairs practising assessment skills on each other under close supervision. Due to the practical nature of this subject, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

Students will be introduced to patient record keeping by keeping a log of the assessments they have undertaken and the outcomes they noted.

  Yes
CMY106A Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the lower body that is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A) & Anatomy & Physiology 2 (BHS104A), and the musculoskeletal components of the human body gained in Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1 (CMY102A).  This subject comprises the study of the back, thorax, pelvis, hip and lower limb.  A practical component of this subject is essential and will incorporate anatomy wetlabs where available, so that students can examine specimens of tissues and regions of the human body in actuality.  Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

  Yes
BHS201A General Pathology

General Pathology introduces the basic pathological processes operating in the body and the ways in which disease may result from injurious stimuli. Basic pathological processes of response to injury, growth abnormalities, degenerative disorders of the musculoskeletal and neurological systems, immunology, toxicology and microbiology, and their characteristic diseases are studied.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary healthcare practitioners as it enables them to understand the nature of various disease states, and correlates these at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms that may be seen in practice.

Yes Yes
CMY201A Neuroscience & Motor Control

Neuroscience & Motor Control introduces students to International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) terminology and aids the student in conceptualising the neurophysiology of pain. The IASP are a worldwide professional association dedicated to research, diagnosis and treatment of pain and, as such, set the standard for pain management guidelines.  This subject provides students with a deeper understanding of human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology.  The most recent theories regarding the development of pain and myofascial trigger points in the human body are discussed together with introducing students to the methods, procedure and contraindications of myofascial dry needling and the supporting evidence.

Yes  
CMY202A Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 2

Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 2 furthers the student to the palpation techniques used in identifying specific muscles and their trigger points and referred pain patterns preparing the student for myofascial dry needling.  Students work in pairs to locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the lower body and limbs.

  Yes
CMY205A Biomechanics & Kinesiology

Biomechanics & Kinesiology introduces the students to the concepts of motion analysis for movements around a joint, forces involved in movement and positioning, and instrumentation for motion analysis. On completion of this subject, the students will be able to analyse movement from real-life examples, and discuss the forces involved. This subject provides the underpinning knowledge for exercise prescription.

Yes*

*(includes 2-day practical intensive)

 
CMY206A Myofascial Dry Needling 1

Myofascial Dry Needling 1 will provide the student with continued and additional information on myofascial trigger points and their associated pain patterns, and develop the ability to apply dry needling techniques in order to reduce the noxious activity of myofascial trigger points in the upper body. This subject will cover the practical application of the principles of infection control and will be delivered in accordance with current Australian safety standards. The ethical considerations for the practical application will be considered throughout and reflected upon in regards to needling for specific pathologies.

  Yes
CMY207A Pain Management 1

Pain Management 1 gives the students comprehensive information about the assessment, treatment, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions of the upper body and builds upon the foundational knowledge acquired in subjects such as Anatomy & Physiology, Pathology and Clinical Assessment. Students develop understanding of musculoskeletal conditions affecting the upper body including the aetiology, incidence, presenting signs and symptoms, clinical and diagnostic features. At the completion of this subject students will be able to distinguish between acute and chronic pain states and evaluate the most effective methods of treatment and management employing sound clinical reasoning.

Yes  
CMY204A Musculoskeletal Pathology

Musculoskeletal Pathology encompasses the common pathological conditions that a Clinical Myotherapist will see in practice and builds upon the core pathological concepts provided in General Pathology (BHS201A). This subject address the morphology, aetiology and underlying general principles operating in disease states in the neurological, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems, in addition to select disease states in the endocrine and pulmonary systems.   An introduction to the currently used laboratory diagnostic methods that would inform diagnosis of conditions in a general practise is also included in this subject.

This subject is a key component in the education of a Clinical Myotherapist, as it provides knowledge of the various disease states that will be seen in practice, and correlates these disease states at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms.

Yes  
CMY209A Exercise Prescription 1

Exercise Prescription 1 introduces students to the practical application of exercise as a therapeutic approach to patient management.  The theories, principles and foundations of exercise prescription are applied to demonstrate suitable and appropriate types of exercise for a range of patient presentations. Students develop an ability to safely and effectively prescribe exercise under close supervision in a classroom situation.  Due to the practical nature of this class, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

  Yes
CMY210A Myofascial Dry Needling 2

Myofascial Dry Needling 2 provides the student with further knowledge on myofascial trigger points and their associated pain patterns and further develops skills in dry-needling techniques.  The focus is on muscles of the torso and lower body.  Clinical Health Management provides the student with the ability to put together a Clinical Myotherapy treatment from history taking to assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management, and provides a platform for their future Clinical Practicum subjects.  Due to the practical nature of this class, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

  Yes
CMY211A Pain Management 2

Pain Management 2 gives the students comprehensive information about the assessment, treatment, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions of the lower body. Students develop understanding of musculoskeletal conditions affecting the lower body including the aetiology, incidence, presenting signs and symptoms, clinical and diagnostic features. At the completion of Pain Management 2, students will be able to describe common pharmacological and cutaneous interventions for pain.

  Yes
CMY212A Clinical Assessment 3

In this practical and theory based class the student will enhance their advancing palpation techniques to perform a comprehensive musculoskeletal and neurological assessment of the spine, sacro-iliac joint and TMJ.  Working in pairs students will build on their practice assessment techniques in a supervised and feedback orientated environment. Students learning will emphasize critically analysing assessment methods based on current research and literature.

  Yes
BHS303A Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology

Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology comprises a study of basic principles of pharmacology, the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly used in medical practice and common drug – drug and drug-myotherapy treatment strategy interactions.  Drugs for pain, inflammation, psychological functions, cancer, infection and the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems are discussed.

This subject examines drug actions, uses, contraindications, adverse effects and interactions, together with implications for myotherapy treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology is crucial for the modern myotherapy practitioner to understand common medications that clients may be taking and common interactions between these medications and treatments as well as medications that support myotherapy treatment strategies.  This subject also emphasizes the need for clear lines of communication and common language between doctors and myotherapy practitioners in order to obtain the best health outcomes for clients.

Yes  
CMY311A Joint Mobilisation

Joint Mobilisation brings together the theory and practical approaches to assessment and treatment. This passive movement technique is applied to a spinal or peripheral joint in which an oscillatory movement is performed within the control of the patient. This subject draws on the ‘concept’ of treatment as developed by G. Maitland in which factors such as clinical reasoning, examination and evaluation are applied to the role of mobilisation in the management of musculoskeletal disorders.

  Yes
CMY303A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 1

In Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 1, students are introduced to working in a student clinic.  Under the close supervision and monitoring of an experienced practitioner, students will begin to consult with and treat members of the public as they present with injuries or conditions.  In this subject students are required to begin integrating all of the theoretical and practical studies undertaken in the course so far.

The clinical experience provides the student with an opportunity to formulate and implement evidenced based and relevant treatment plans while exhibiting appreciation of the necessary ethical and medico-legal responsibilities inherent in the practitioner-patient relationship.

  Yes
CMY304A Exercise Prescription 2

Building on the knowledge and skills of Exercise Prescription 1 (CMY209A), and Lifespan Myotherapy (CMY301A) students are developing their exercise prescription skills to embrace a variety of resources, equipment, facilities, settings & venues in their management of specific conditions and special populations. Due to the practical nature of this subject, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

  Yes
CMY306A Pain Management 3

Pain Management 3 follows the curriculum provided by the International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP), discussing medical and alternative treatment and management of painful conditions. This curriculum provides the student with an in-depth understanding of the pain management strategies for a variety of conditions and an appreciation of other options of treatment and management.

Yes  
CMY307A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 2

In Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 2, students continue the student clinic experience, integrating new information as other theoretical and practical subjects are completed. Students are closely monitored by a suitably qualified and experienced Clinical Myotherapist.

  Yes
CMY305A Critical Literature Review

In this subject students write a literature review on a topic of their choice, which must examine a clinical aspect of their speciality. The emphasis is on presenting and critically evaluating current literature by searching for and appraising the literature, and writing a clear and fully referenced literature review. Students will be expected to present a proposal early in the trimester, and a full literature review by the end of the trimester. The in class experience is practical in nature where the students are provided a collaborative environment to  cover the process of writing a literature review, ask questions and receive feedback on their own projects.

Yes  
CMY309A Neuropsychology

Neuropsychology provides the student with knowledge about the psychological aspects of pain in the human body and psychological considerations in pain management. Students develop and explore knowledge of the current theories relating to the environmental dimensions and biopsychosocial influences of pain and their relationship to psychological issues. Neuropsychology will further increase the student’s knowledge in health behaviour models, mental health issues and the role of social and occupational factors in pain management.

Yes  
CMY310A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 3

Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 3 is the final clinical practicum for the Clinical Myotherapy degree.  Students are closely monitored by a suitably qualified and experienced practitioner.  In this subject they are drawing on every aspect of their studies to assess, diagnose, treat, manage and refer patients in the student clinic environment.

  Yes
BHS401A Professional Practice

Professional Ethical Practice comprises the basic skills needed for the operation and management of a complementary healthcare practice and provides an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements that are pertinent to the complementary healthcare practitioner. This subject explores business strategies including operating policy and procedures, marketing and networking strategies, leadership duties and administrative and financial issues.  Also included in this subject is ethical conduct, liability, legal and regulatory topics.

Yes Yes

Elective Subjects

Subject details Subject Availability
Online Melbourne Campus
HWEL2009 – Active Ageing and Falls Prevention

The problem of falls is a significant global issue and can result in injury, hospitalisation, loss of independence, social isolation, depression, poor health status, institutionalism and death. The World Health Organisation identify falls as occurring as a result of complex interrelationships between biological, behavioural, environmental and socioeconomic risk factors. With the predicted costs of falls expected to increase exponentially as our population ages there is a need for effective preventive strategies such as active ageing programs. This subject examines these complexities of ageing, where students will learn to assess falls risk and develop effective prevention strategies that promote wellbeing in ageing populations.

Yes  
HWEL2010 Corporate Health

The occupational environment plays an important role in combating or promoting the rise of chronic disease and disability. This environment has the capacity to affect the physical, psychological, economic and social well-being of workers’ and thus, proper attention to workers’ health offers vast opportunities for workers and employers alike. In this subject students will explore evidence linking worker health and wellbeing to organizational health and business performance. Specific analysis for business needs will be considered, with practical interventions designed to educate and enhance the occupational environment.

Yes  
FHN201 Foundations of Human Nutrition

 

This subject provides students with fundamental nutrition knowledge through examining the relationship between food, nutrition and human health.  Students will learn about macro and micro-nutrition, dietary guidelines, role of nutrition in metabolism, health maintenance and disease, nutrient rich food sources, and the specific nutritional requirements throughout the lifespan. Students will also learn how to identify and construct a healthy diet according to specific dietary guidelines, and know the impact of nutritional deficiency and excess as they relate to health and disease.

 

Yes  
SEN301 Social Enterprise

Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretically-based subject that is driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. These activities harness design thinking and problem-solving processes in the realisation of pragmatic, viable project proposals from initiation to client presentation.

By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities through systematic research and competitor analysis, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop and propose new ventures and products that focus primarily upon social change for good. In addition, this subject will help students understand and address the practical challenges of working within this environment; to analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, to explore diverse funding strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy. Social Enterprise enables students to appreciate the power of creativity in problem-solving and the importance of the designer’s role in making a difference and precipitating change.

 

     Yes  
CMY301A Lifespan Myotherapy

Lifespan Myotherapy provides students with the knowledge of how to treat musculoskeletal pain that is relevant to paediatric and geriatric patients as well as in-depth knowledge on contraindications/precautions and acceptable treatments for pre and post-natal patients. This subject also provides students with knowledge about the impact of illness/injury/pain on quality of life. It incorporates theory on the history and efficacy of CAM and traditional remedies. Information relating to disease-specific population groups, as well as indigenous health issues and cultural implications for treatment will be incorporated.

 

  Yes
CMY312A Sports Injury Management

Sports Injury Management builds upon the clinical skills of assessment and treatment, with specific application to the athletic populations. This subject provides students with the underpinning theory and a range of practical skills to work in the sporting environment and support the prevention and management of common sporting injuries.

Professionalism, ethics and responsibilities are addressed, along with emergency action planning and on-field trauma management skills. Students will learn to apply evidence based and clinically reasoned decisions in sport specific return-to-play scenarios, and gain the practical skills to support return to play including taping and pre-game athlete support.

Students will be expected to complete clinical placement hours with a sporting club either previously or concurrently with this elective to support learning. Assistance to find placements will be provided.

  Yes

 

*Elective options are subject to availability

Career outcomes

There is a continually growing demand for highly trained Clinical Myotherapists who can work in:

  • Complementary health and wellbeing clinics
  • Medical clinics
  • Sporting clubs and
  • Industries that require the treatment of pain management and musculoskeletal treatment.

Furthermore many students have gone on to set up their own successful clinics, undertaken post-graduate study, worked overseas, and worked voluntarily to give something back to the community.

What you will learn:

The application of Clinical Myotherapy requires a comprehensive theoretical knowledge in the biomedical and clinical sciences combined with a proficiency in clinical reasoning and the dexterity to utilise discipline-specific manual skills. These attributes must also be supported with communication and management skills, an appreciation of legal and ethical issues as well as an understanding of psychosocial theories.

The distinguishing feature of Clinical Myotherapy is its specific form of clinical reasoning where standard methods of assessment, such as postural evaluation, orthopedic, neurological and functional testing, are accompanied by a thorough palpatory exploration of spinal and peripheral joint-play, the contractile state of specific muscles and an interpretation of these findings in their relationship to musculoskeletal pain.

Clinical Myotherapy practice is strongly associated with expert knowledge in musculoskeletal and neuro-anatomy and the addition of cadaveric wet lab workshops reinforce and deepens this knowledge. Practical skills-based subjects are an important aspect throughout this course and all practical subjects connect back to the structure and function of the musculoskeletal system, the biomedical and social sciences and the evidence base that supports clinical practice.  The skill set of a Clinical Myotherapist includes physical assessment and history taking skills; manual skills that include massage, neuromuscular techniques, myofascial release and joint mobilisation; thermotherapies, dry-needling, exercise prescription and pain management techniques to focus on rehabilitation from acute and chronic pain. With this integrated therapeutic approach, graduates can alleviate both acute and chronic conditions arising from occupational, sporting and recreational activities.

Students will gain hands-on experience at the Think Wellbeing Centre under the guidance of experienced practitioners in a clinical setting treating public patients. Graduates will become the highest qualified Myotherapy practitioners in Australia, with the skills and knowledge to greatly improve the quality of life for people suffering from musculoskeletal pain.

Assessment:

Each subject includes approximately 3 assessments pieces on average.  Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include online quizzes, written assignments, presentations, reflective journals, case analysis, literature reviews, practical exams and written exams.

Your study, your way – degrees at SSNT:

At SSNT we offer a range of flexible options to suit you. Every SSNT subject has a range of resources available online to support your learning and allow you access to study when it best suits you. We call this a blended approach – blending self-directed study with directed quizzes and activities (online) and face-to-face teaching in one of our purpose-built teaching spaces.

Some subjects are available fully online, while other subjects must be taken on-campus, in one of our specialist facilities. Other subjects are offered in both modes, and you can choose which one suits your learning style and other commitments.

Most of the subjects are designed around the principles of the “flipped classroom”: you learn through doing, not just through listening. The flipped classroom model provides you with the opportunity to study and absorb lecture material at your own pace before class. This might involve reading articles or texts, watching presentations or listening to podcasts.

Rather than sitting in rows and listening to a lecturer up the front for an hour or more, you’ll come to class prepared having read through or listened to the subject material. Guided by an expert in the field, you will then then find a much more interactive and collaborative environment in which to consolidate and apply the things you’ve learned.

If you choose to study some subjects online, you will be part of an active online class, with discussions, forums and activities. You will receive comprehensive learning materials (in electronic form) clearly laid out in a week by week format to make sure you cover each topic in turn. You will have access to dedicated online teachers to answer any questions you may have regarding your subjects and you’ll see them and hear them in interactive presentations online.

Students enrol at SSNT because they want to become expert practitioners and The Wellbeing Clinic at Fitzroy campus provides the perfect hands on teaching environment to hone your craft. The Clinic is a real-life, multi-modality clinic serving the needs of the surrounding communities.  You’ll treat real patients, and work with a professional clinic team, gaining experience in all aspects of working in, and running your own clinical practice, engaging with real clients in a safe and supervised environment. In the year or more you’ll spend in clinic you’ll undergo a transformation from theoretical student to graduate practitioner, all under the expert supervision of some of Australia’s best clinicians.

Clinical Industry Placement

In addition to the time spent in the Wellbeing Clinic, students complete external clinical placement throughout their study.

This requires the completion of observation and practice hours under the supervision of clinicians in practice and recorded by a reflective log as part of an e-portfolio that builds as evidence experience throughout the degree. The time spent in the workplace environment is invaluable to the advancement of a student’s technical skills and professional development, allowing for further application, understanding and reflection in clinical practice on a variety of subjects.

There are a number of exciting clinical placement opportunities that students can choose from across a variety of industries including;

  • Sporting clubs (Including AFL, NPL Football, Rugby, Basketball)
  • Multidisciplinary health practices
  • Private practices
  • Allied health clinics
  • Performing Arts including Ballet & Circus Arts

Making the most of these opportunities have often led students to future employment within their preferred industry. To get started, please make an appointment with your Success Coach when you commence your course.

Pathway opportunities into the degree:

The Southern School respects prior study, and now offers clear pathway opportunities for practitioners to upgrade their qualifications in Remedial Massage at Diploma level and Myotherapy at Advanced Diploma level. Exemptions allow for advanced standing in the degree through block credit exemptions:

 

Opportunities also exist for those with related Bachelor of Health Science qualifications including exercise physiology, exercise science, nursing and many other related health professions. For more information see: /looking-for-a-pathway-into-clinical-myotherapy

Campus locations

This course is available at our Fitzroy (Melbourne) campus.

Campus facilities and services

All campuses are designed to provide students with professional spaces in which to learn and work. They have been planned with student study needs in mind with well-equipped accessible learning spaces as well as student breakout areas for group work and spending time with friends.

Facilities and Services include:

The Customer Service Hub – our friendly and experienced staff can give help and advice about courses, your enrolment and campus life, including all services and activities on campus.

Counsellors are available for students to consult with on a range of personal issues

Student wireless access throughout the Campus

Student break-out and relaxed study spaces for group work

Student lounge areas – most with microwaves, kitchenette facilities and vending machines

The Learning Hub, home to the Learning Support Team, encompasses Learning Skills Advisors, Learning Technology Advisors, and Library & Learning Skills Officers. It provides an integrated, holistic support program for students throughout the study lifecycle within a library/collaborative study environment.

The service includes:

Support and workshops with highly qualified staff in the areas of Academic skills, Library skills, and Technology skills, both on campus and online.

Physical and digital resources relevant to studies, such as books, journals, multimedia, databases

Self-check kiosks for library loans and print and copy facilities

Rehabilitation Room – specialist area with strength and conditioning equipment

The Wellbeing Centre – student clinic facilities

Success Coaches: 

Our Success Coaches are industry and education experts who leverage your strengths to align your learning with your broader life purpose. With a focus on career goals, and trained in Gallup Strength methodologies, your Success Coach will take a strengths-based approach to helping you set your learning and career goals.

Partnering with you for the duration of your studies, the Success Coach is here to make sense of all of the learning experiences, including readiness for and securing of work integrated learning, placements, internships and opportunities in internal enterprises.  All of our coaches are industry professionals, which will give you that inside edge you’ll need to be successful in your chosen career.

Irrelevant of how you like to learn, our coaches are there for you.  Coaching can take place online, or on campus.  Our main priorities are to make sure that you are always well connected and motivated, that you are successfully completing your desired subjects, and that you gain valuable knowledge and experience through participation and engagement, whilst always aligning to your natural talents.

A positive student experience

Think: Colleges values the importance of a positive student experience, and therefore has robust processes to resolve student complaints.  The Student Complaints Policy, and associated procedures, can be access from the website.

Paying for your qualification

We offer two payment options for this course:

Upfront payment

If you want to complete your qualification debt-free you can choose to pay as you go. This means tuition fees will be invoiced each trimester and payment is required on or before the due date using EFTPOS, credit card or Flywire.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses.

It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold ($54,869 in 2016-17). Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Further information about FEE-HELP, including eligibility, is available at:

FEE-HELP website

FEE-HELP booklets

Austudy and Abstudy

Students enrolled in this course may be eligible for government assistance, such as Austudy or Abstudy.

Frequently Asked Questions:

How do I Apply?

Trimester 1 intake (February), full time study

Mature-age students: Can apply directly with the school by contacting the college and requesting an application pack. To apply students are required to submit their application along with the required documents to meet the entry criteria. When applying under the special entry scheme, an interview can be arranged with the Course and Career Advisors by contacting the college on 03 9415 3333.

School Leavers: For entry to Trimester 1, school leavers must apply through the Victorian Tertiary Admissions Centre (VTAC) by listing the Southern School of Natural Therapies in their preferences. For more information please visit the VTAC website – www.vtac.edu.au  If the VTAC deadline has passed or you are applying for the mid-year intake recent school leavers can apply directly with the college. The VTAC preference code is 9250192562.

Are SSNT qualifications recognised?

Our Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy) degree is nationally recognised and designed to meet the professional requirements of the following industry organisations:

MA (Myotherapy Association Australia)

ANTA (Australian Natural Therapists Association)

MMA (Massage and Myotherapy Australia)

SMA (Sports Medicine Australia)

Is Course Credit available?

Yes, course credit is available upon application and academic approval.  This credit can take the form of credit transfer, block credit, or Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL).  For further information, consult our friendly Course and Careers Advisor, or visit the website.

Will SSNT help me find a job once I graduate?

Alumni of the School are assisted throughout their early career. SSNT has strong relationships with the complementary medicine industry and professional associations, many of whom are invited on campus to present to students and Alumni. Potential employers, clinics and organisations regularly advertise positions to SSNT students and a job board is available to students and graduates on the Campus Portal.

What are the Employment Opportunities like?

Clinical Myotherapists are well-respected and highly sought after practitioners and many opportunities exist for graduates of SSNT. There is a continually growing demand for highly trained practitioners who can work in various settings such as sporting clubs/teams, multimodality clinics, medical clinics, research, education and independent practice. Many students have gone on to set up their own successful clinics, undertaken postgraduate study, worked overseas, published journals and books, and worked voluntarily to give something back to the community. All of our degrees meet industry association requirements in their chosen areas, so students can register to become a member of professional associations.

What kind of support will I receive?

MySSNT: Check your own academic records and results

Campus Portal: Course materials, on-line access to resources, events and activities at the campus.

Students Services: First point of contact for academic and administrative enquiries.

Counselling: Free of charge and available for all students facing personal or study issues.

Alf Jacka Library: One of the most extensive collections of books, journals, audio, CD-ROM’s and DVD’s on complementary medicine in Australia.

Program Managers: Guidance and academic support, course sequencing, credit exemptions.

Study Skills: Support for students new to higher education, covering study basics and academic skills.

Science Success: Pre-trimester workshop for new students who haven’t studied science (biology and chemistry) at year 12, or who want a refresher before they start.

The SRC (Student Representative Council) at the Southern School of Natural Therapies is a forum for students across all modalities to work together and create a greater sense of community on campus

I haven’t studied in a long time?

It is perfectly natural to feel nervous about starting a new course. The Southern School has a proud tradition of delivering academic excellence and practical training in a nurturing and supportive environment.  The School has a diverse student community with people from all walks of life, including young adults and mature age students, as more and more people are seeking an exciting career in health and complementary medicine.

Does SSNT have an orientation program?

Yes, Southern School of Natural Therapies supports new students with a program of events, workshops, wellness classes, campus tours and course-specific classes in orientation week. Students new to health science are also invited to join the Science Success program which covers basic chemistry, mathematics for health science and medical terminology.

Are the teachers practitioners?

Yes. Many of the country’s leading practitioners are on staff at SSNT, all with substantial experience in their respective areas of expertise. We are passionate about we do, and constantly seek new and innovative ways to teach the theoretical knowledge and clinical skills needed for excellence in complementary medicine.

What are the enrolment dates for the courses?

Contact the Course and Careers Advisor now for upcoming enrolment dates and check the Southern School website for key dates in the academic calendar.

I’m not sure which course is right for me?

If you are not sure which path to follow, you can start the higher education Diploma of Health Science at SSNT. Successful completion guarantees you entry in to any of the Bachelor of Health Science programs, with varying levels of subject exemption depending on your subject choice. Contact the Course and Careers Advisor to discuss your course options and career goals.

What materials and equipment will I need to provide?

There are a limited number of subjects with prescribed textbooks that you might find useful to purchase to support your studies, however these text will be available within our library and online e-brary (where possible) and are not mandatory to purchase.

Contact Us

Find us on Facebook and Twitter to keep up to date with our latest news, information and events – www.facebook.com/southernschool and www.twitter.com/Southern_School
© Southern School of Natural Therapies is a trading division of Think: Colleges Pty Ltd
ABN: 93 050 049 299      CRICOS: 00246M              RTO No: 0269                    HEP No: 4375
Date of Publication: August 2015

Campus details (including facilities & Library): /campus/campus-facilities

Address: 25 Victoria Street, Fitzroy

Phone: 03 9415 3333

Email: /contact-us

Think: Colleges Pty Ltd, trading as: Southern School of Natural Therapies

 

About Think: Colleges

campus locationshttp://www.think.edu.au/colleges

information about open days http://www.think.edu.au/news-and-events/events/about/ssnt-events

important dateshttp://www.think.edu.au/studying-at-think/key-dates

contact detailshttp://www.think.edu.au/contact-us