1. About the Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy)

Persistent pain is a leading cause of long-term disability in the western world, affecting more people than diabetes, heart disease and cancer combined. It decreases quality of life, increases sickness absence, and compromises wellbeing in a growing proportion of our society, placing a significant burden on local and global communities.

Providing access to treatment, promoting physical activity, and education to understand their pain in a biopsychosocial framework are key solutions to these problems.

Through high quality health education, Clinical Myotherapists have a sound understanding of human structure and function to apply evidenced based assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions. Clinical Myotherapists are part of the solution for individuals and the community.

“Clinical Myotherapists support better musculoskeletal health”

Myotherapy is considered to be the evidence base assessment, treatment and rehabilitation of musculoskeletal pain and associated conditions (Myotherapy Association Australia, 2018). The term ‘Myotherapy’ comes from the Greek word ‘myo’ or ‘muscle’, and Clinical Myotherapy is now a system of healthcare that focuses on the treatment and prevention of musculoskeletal pain (pain in the muscles, nerves and joints). Its methods of physical and orthopedic assessment share some similarities with other manual therapy disciplines such as Physiotherapy and Osteopathy. However, Clinical Myotherapy can have greater reliance on physical soft tissue treatment methods that accompany a complete treatment plan.  There is also a strong focus on working in a clinical setting, an aspect of this degree that many Myotherapy students enjoy.

By assessing the movement, contraction and function of the muscles, nerves and joints, Clinical Myotherapists are able to treat complaints and prescribe pain management and rehabilitation regimes that are tailored to individual patient needs. Clinical Myotherapy differentiates itself from other Myotherapy qualifications by its focus on in-depth scientific underpinnings and its evidence-based approach to clinical practice.  This higher-level learning allows for a broader perspective of the clinical picture and enables clinical diagnoses and treatment to be more focused for effective patient outcomes.  It also provides opportunities for academic development in post-graduate areas, with many students choosing to onto post-graduate pain management and physiotherapy qualifications.

Clinical Myotherapists combine fundamental health science knowledge with manual physical therapy skills, pain management, and exercise therapy to help people to recover from pain and injury, improving their physical function and quality of life.

This three-year degree is approved by TEQSA (Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency) the National Australian accreditation body for Higher Education providers.

Graduate employment opportunities

There is a continually growing demand for highly trained Clinical Myotherapists who can work in:

  • Medical and allied clinics
  • Complementary health and wellbeing clinics
  • Sporting clubs
  • Industries that require the treatment of pain management and musculoskeletal treatment.

Furthermore, many students have gone on to set up their own successful clinics, undertaken post-graduate study, worked overseas, and worked voluntarily to give something back to the community.

Graduate Recognition

Our Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy)degree meets the requirements for graduates to join the following organisations:

  • MA (Myotherapy Association Australia)
  • MMA (Massage and Myotherapy Australia)

Pathways into the Myotherapy degree

The Southern School respects prior study, and now offers clear pathway opportunities for practitioners to upgrade their qualifications in Remedial Massage at Diploma level and Myotherapy at Advanced Diploma level. Exemptions allow for advanced standing in the degree through block credit exemptions. Speak to one of our course and careers advisors for further detail

Course Overview

Course Title BHSCMYO13 BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (CLINICAL MYOTHERAPY)
Study Options – Domestic Australian students Full-time or part time on campus. Study Options – International students  

Full – time on campus

Start Dates February, June, September

For specific dates visit: Student Hub

Course Length Full-time: 3 year

Part-time:  approximately 6 years

Payment Options – Domestic Australian students Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date.

FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses. It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold. Just like with any other debt, a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Payment Options – International students Upfront payment

This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date.

Course study requirements Full Time: 3 years

Part Time: 6 years

Full time = 3 x 12 week trimesters per year, including examinations.

Part time = 6 x 12 week trimesters  (over two years)

Study load:

Full time = 4 x 3hr classes per week plus self-study hours. Total of 40hrs per week.

Part time = 2 x 3hr classes per week plus self-study. Total of 20hrs per week.

Assessment  Each subject you complete includes 3 assessments on average. Assessments are mapped to specific subject learning outcomes and may include quizzes, written assignments, presentation, reflective journal, case analysis, literature review and practical exam.
Locations Fitzroy campus, Melbourne Delivered by Southern School of Natural Therapies (SSNT)

CRICOS Provider 00246M

Provider Think: Colleges Pty Ltd is registered as a Higher Education Provider with Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA) CRICOS Course Code 084579F
Provider obligations Think: Colleges Pty Ltd is responsible for all aspects of the student experience, including the quality of course delivery, in compliance with the Higher Education Standards 2015 Accrediting body Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
Course Fees For details, refer to the website. Any other fees For details, refer to the website.
  1. Essential requirements for admission

The general admission criteria that apply to THINK courses can be located by visiting the THINK website:  /apply/admissions-criteria

  1. Student Profile

The table below gives an indication of the likely peer cohort for new students in this course. It provides data on students who commenced in this course in the most relevant recent intake period, including those admitted through all offer rounds and international students studying in Australia.

Applicant background Trimester one 2020
Number of students Percentage of all students
(A) Higher education study
(includes a bridging or enabling course)
< 5 0%
(B) Vocational education and training (VET) study 12 60%
(C) Work and life experience
(Admitted on the basis of previous achievement not in the other three categories)
< 5 0%
(D) Recent secondary education:    

·         Admitted solely on the basis of ATAR
(regardless of whether this includes the consideration of
adjustment factors such as equity or subject bonus points)

< 5 0%
·         Admitted where both ATAR and additional criteria were considered
(e.g. portfolio, audition, extra test, early offer conditional on minimum ATAR)
0 0%
·         Admitted on the basis of other criteria only and ATAR was not a factor
(e.g. special consideration, audition alone, schools recommendation scheme with no minimum ATAR requirement)
0 0%
International students 0 0%
All students 20 100%

Notes:          “<5” – the number of students is less than 5.

N/A – Students not accepted in this category.

N/P – Not published: the number is hidden to prevent calculation of numbers in cells with less than 5 students.

  1. Admission Criteria
Title of course of study BHSCMYO13 BACHELOR OF HEALTH SCIENCE (CLINICAL MYOTHERAPY)
Applicants with higher education study ·         A completed higher education qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another  accredited higher education provider

OR

·         Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 6 (Associate Degree) or above, or equivalent, from an Australian University or another accredited higher education provider

Applicants with vocational education and training (VET) study

·         A completed vocational education qualification at AQF level 4 (Certificate IV) or above, or equivalent, from a registered training organisation (RTO)

OR

·         Successful completion of at least 1 EFTSL (equivalent full time student load, or one full year) of an AQF level 5 (Diploma) or above, or equivalent, at a registered training organisation (RTO)

Applicants with work and life experience Demonstrated ability to undertake study at the required level:

·       broadly relevant work experience (documented e.g.

CV), demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success; OR

·         formal, informal or non-formal study, completed or partially completed, demonstrating a reasonable prospect of success;

OR

·         a written submission to demonstrate reasonable prospect of success.

English Language Proficiency

(applicable to international students, and in addition to academic or special entry requirements noted above)

International Students

Equivalent IELTS 6.5 (Academic) with no skills band less than 5.5

Applicants with recent secondary education (within the past two years) with ATAR or equivalent*

(for applicants who will be selected wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR)

 

Year 12 or equivalent

*ATAR profile for those offered places wholly or partly on the basis of ATAR in T1 2020:

(ATAR-based offers only, across all offer rounds)

ATAR (OP in QLD)
(Excluding adjustment factors) *
Highest rank to receive an offer N/A
Median rank to receive an offer N/A
Lowest rank to receive an offer N/A

Notes:  * “<5” – indicates less than 5 ATAR-based offers were made

Other admission options

 (For applicants who will be selected on a basis other than ATAR)

Special Entry Applicants in any category whose study, work or life experiences have been impacted by disability, illness or family disruption will be given special consideration for admission. Each application will be considered on its merit, based on the evidence supplied by the applicant attesting to the circumstances of the applicant. Applicants for special entry may need to complete written or numerical tasks to assist with assessing eligibility for admission.
  1. How to apply

Via direct application to the institution at the link below:

Southern School of Natural Therapies

  1. Advanced standing/academic credit/recognition of prior learning (RPL)

You may be entitled to credit for prior learning, whether formal or informal. Formal learning can include previous study in higher education, vocational education, or adult and community education. Informal learning can include on the job learning or various kinds of work and life experience. Credit can reduce the amount of study needed to complete a degree.

Applicants admitted based on prior higher education study may be eligible for Advanced Standing in the form of credit and/or recognition of prior learning (RPL) under the Southern School of Natural Therapies:

  • Students with completed subjects may be eligible for specified credit and/or elective exemptions
  • Students who have completed a qualification at AQF level 5 (diploma) or above may be eligible for block credit (where a block credit agreement exists)
  • Students with a mix of formal study and informal and/or non-formal learning may be eligible for recognition of prior learning in addition to any credit approved.

Credit will not be applied automatically. Applicants must apply for credit and/or RPL as early as possible prior to each study period, with applications not accepted after week 2.

For further information about credit and recognition of prior learning, please see:

Credit Policy

  1. Where to get further information
  • Southern School of Natural Therapies (SSNT) Website
  • Universities Admissions Centre (UAC) Website.
    UACs manage the usual process of student university applications and the study offer rounds on behalf of the particular universities that they cover. All TACs are independent of each other, so depending on which state or the number of universities you want to submit an application to, you may need to apply through multiple TACs. https://www.uac.edu.au/

Quality Indicators for Learning and Teaching (QILT) Website.

With QILT, you can do side by side comparisons of the quality of the higher education institutions and the study areas that you’re interested in.
 

  1. Additional Information

Course Structure

This course consists of 36 subjects. Each subject is worth 10 credit points for a course total of 360 credit points. A normal full-time study load would see a student complete 120 credit points per year for three years.   Part – time student could complete the course in approximately 6 years.

Each year has three Study Periods or trimesters.   Each subject includes 3 hours of teaching (e.g. classroom hours, tutorials, group work, online activities) and approximately 7 hours of self-directed study per week, totaling 10 hours of study per week per subject.

The course structure can be viewed or downloaded via the Student Hub, Course Webpage

course structure

Course Rules

To graduate from the course, a student must successfully complete 36 subjects. Each has a value of 10 credit points.

Students are also required to complete 300 Clinical Industry Placement points.   A total of 80 points must be completed by start of the 2nd year subjects, 180 by the start of the 3rd year subjects, and 300 in order to graduate. These points are accrued through clinical placement and professional development activities.

Subjects

Subjects are listed below by subject code please refer to course structure link (above) for delivery pattern.  Please note these subject descriptions are subject to change.

Subject details
BHS101A Anatomy & Physiology 1

Anatomy and Physiology 1 introduces the basic concepts and terminologies required to study and understand the structure and function of the human body. The interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis is covered in detail. In addition, this subject covers the structure and function of cells and epithelial tissue, the internal structural anatomy of the human body and the integumentary and musculoskeletal systems.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary health practitioners, as it enables them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains this balance.

 
BHS102A Bioscience

Bioscience provides a foundational knowledge for further studies in anatomy and physiology, clinical nutrition, biochemistry and pharmacology. It comprises the study of relevant concepts of general, physical and organic chemistry and includes atomic theory, the periodic table, chemical compound structure, nomenclature, behaviour and bonding as well as organic compounds and their basic properties and reactions.

Bioscience (BHS102A) is a crucial component of the modern healthcare practitioner’s education in order to provide the basic building blocks for structural and therapeutic knowledge.

 
BHS103A Counselling & Communication Skills

Counselling & Communication Skills encompasses counselling skills commonly needed by complementary and alternative healthcare practitioners. This subject comprises a practical approach to a variety of communication skills and strategies including promoting change, compliance, obstacles to change, transition and self-care.  Sessions facilitate the development of effective listening and responding skills, increased personal awareness and insight in order to assist the building of a therapeutic relationship.

This subject is vital in the education of all healthcare practitioners, as it enables them to understand and put into use communication skills essential for building a therapeutic relationship in practice and supporting clients through change.

 
CMY101A Myotherapy History & Foundations

Myotherapy history and foundations teaches the fundamentals of Clinical Myotherapy practice. As a practical skills based class, students will develop skills in soft tissue massage, palpation, draping, patient positioning and patient management. Students will develop awareness of WH&S obligations and the historical origins of Clinical Myotherapy in Australia and its relationship to other manual medicine modalities.

 
BHS104A Anatomy & Physiology 2

Anatomy and Physiology 2 builds and expands on the information and skills learnt in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A). This subject continues to investigate the structure and function of the human body with special attention given to the interaction between tissues, organs and systems that maintain homeostasis. The structure and function of the respiratory, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic and special senses systems are covered in detail including the homoeostatic control mechanisms of each system and the integration of the systems in the body.

The study of Anatomy and Physiology 2 (BHS104A) is vital in the education of healthcare practitioners to enable them to understand the structure and function of the human body as well as the importance of homeostasis and the ways in which the body maintains balance.

 
BHS105A Biochemistry 1

Biochemistry 1 is a core subject that builds upon the basic chemistry principles covered in Bioscience (BHS102A).  It comprises an introduction to the basic biochemical compounds in the body. This subject includes the structure and function of carbohydrates, amino acids, proteins, enzymes, lipids and nucleic acid, DNA and RNA.  The concept of gene expression and regulation is discussed in addition to cellular membrane structure and transport through the membrane.

This subject provides a vital foundation for the complementary healthcare practitioner in the basic macromolecules essential for life.  This knowledge will be built upon and expanded on in Biochemistry 2 (BHS202A) and further therapeutic subjects.

 
CMY102A Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 1 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the upper body that is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A).  This subject introduces students to the musculoskeletal components of the human body in a theoretical and practical setting, and comprises the study of the axial and appendicular skeleton (upper limb), nervous system, cervical and thoracic spine, head, and shoulder. A practical component of this subject is essential and will incorporate study in the structure and function labs, so that students can examine tissues and regions of the human body in closer actuality.  Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

 
CMY103A Neuromuscular Techniques

In this practical based subject, students will learn the fundamentals of soft tissue mobilisation techniques used to treat neuromusculoskeletal disorders. In a supervised clinical classroom environment the student will learn palpatory assessment techniques, massage, myofascial release (MFR), cupping, neuromuscular techniques and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching.  Neuromuscular Techniques is an experiential learning based class and the student will practice and experience mobilisation techniques with their classmates by being both a patient and a practitioner to gain a full understanding of the soft tissue mobilisation methods, their uses and what they feel like. The student will also gain clinical experience in a supervised external placement according to their specific areas of interest.

 
BHS107A Research & Evidence-Based Practice

Research & Evidence Based Practice provides essential knowledge in research methods and research article evaluation for complementary medicine students. This subject introduces the fundamentals of research practice and methods for the natural therapies including research design, methodology, analysis and basic statistical skills. This subject provides the student with the proficiency to be able to appropriately read, analyse and evaluate current healthcare research.

 
CMY104A Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 1

Surface Anatomy and Trigger Point Location 1 is a practical based class in which students will further develop their surface anatomy and trigger point referral pattern knowledge in relation to the upper limb, thorax, neck and head. Students will also develop their palpation skills through practical components. Students will locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the upper body. Using palpation techniques in a supervised and feedback orientated learning environment students will learn to identify specific muscles, their trigger points and referred pain patterns.

 
CMY105A Clinical Assessment 1

Clinical Assessment will draw on their knowledge of upper body anatomy from musculoskeletal anatomy of upper limb, head, neck and thorax, and learn the theory and practical skills required in order to perform a comprehensive upper body musculoskeletal and neurological assessment.  These skills will give the student the underpinning clinical reasoning of a practicing Clinical Myotherapist.  In a supervised clinical environment, students will practice assessment skills on their fellow students, with ongoing feedback provided in order to fine tune assessment techniques and practice.  Students will be introduced to patient record keeping through documenting assessments and outcomes through keeping a clinical logbook.

 
CMY106A Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2

Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2 builds upon the foundational knowledge of the formation and spatial relationships of the tissues and joints of the lower body which is gained in Anatomy and Physiology 1 (BHS101A) & Anatomy & Physiology 2 (BHS104A). This subject comprises the study of the pelvis, hip and lower limb. A practical component of this subject is essential and will incorporate study in the structure and function labs, so that students can examine tissues and regions of the human body in closer actuality. Dynamic anatomic and cadaveric software and models will also be part of the practical component.

 
BHS201A General Pathology

General Pathology introduces the basic pathological processes operating in the body and the ways in which disease may result from injurious stimuli. Basic pathological processes of response to injury, growth abnormalities, degenerative disorders of the musculoskeletal and neurological systems, immunology, toxicology and microbiology, and their characteristic diseases are studied.

This subject is vital in the education of all complementary healthcare practitioners as it enables them to understand the nature of various disease states, and correlates these at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms that may be seen in practice.

 
CMY201A Neuroscience & Motor Control

Neuroscience & Motor Control introduces students to International Association for the Study of Pain (IASP) terminology and aids the student in conceptualising the neurophysiology of pain. The IASP are a worldwide professional association dedicated to research, diagnosis and treatment of pain and, as such, set the standard for pain management guidelines.  This subject provides students with a deeper understanding of human neuroanatomy and neurophysiology and its relation  to  pain  both  from  a peripheral and central nervous system perspective.

 
CMY202A Surface Anatomy & Trigger Point Location 2

Surface Anatomy and Trigger Point Location 2   is a practical based class in which students will further develop their surface anatomy and trigger point referral pattern knowledge in relation to the lower limb, thorax, pelvis and abdomen. Students will also develop their palpation skills through practical components. Students will locate and explore bony landmarks, tendons, muscles, ligaments, pulses and other soft tissue structures and areas of the lower body. Using palpation techniques in a supervised and feedback orientated learning environment students will learn to identify specific muscles, their trigger points and referred pain patterns.

 
CMY203A   Clinical Assessment 2

In Clinical Assessment 2 (CMY203A) the student will draw on their knowledge of lower body anatomy from Musculoskeletal Anatomy 2 (CMY106A).  The student will learn the theory and practical skills required to order perform a comprehensive lower body musculoskeletal and neurological assessment. These skills will give the student the underpinning clinical reasonings of a practicing clinical Myotherapist.  In a supervised clinical environment, students will practice their assessment skills on each other, with ongoing feedback provided in order to fine tune assessment technique and practice.

 
CMY205A Biomechanics & Kinesiology

Biomechanics and Kinesiology will introduce the core concepts of motion analysis – a key underpinning of exercise prescription. The student will learn joint movement, forces involved in movement and positioning, and instrumentation for motion analysis. On completion, the student will have skills in place to analyse movement and discuss the forces involved.

 
CMY206A Myofascial Dry Needling 1

In this practical and theory based class the student will build on their myofascial trigger point and associated pain pattern knowledge of the upper body and limbs. Dry needling techniques will be developed in order to treat the noxious activity of trigger points using infection control principals in accordance with Australian safety standards and ethical considerations for specific pathologies.  A practical skillset will also be developed, and the dexterity in the tactile detection and anatomical identification of individual myofascial trigger points will be enhanced, as will the ethical understandings of patient care and safety.

 
CMY207A Pain Management 1

Pain Management 1 introduces concepts of pain and gives the students comprehensive information about assessment, diagnosis and management of musculoskeletal conditions of the upper body within a biopsychosocial framework. This subject introduces outcome measures for pain assessment and builds upon the foundational knowledge acquired in subjects such as Anatomy & Physiology, Clinical Assessment and Neuroscience. Students develop an understanding of acute and chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions affecting the upper body. This includes aetiology, incidence clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis and biopsychosocial management strategies.

 
CMY204A Musculoskeletal Pathology

Musculoskeletal Pathology encompasses the common pathological conditions that a Clinical Myotherapist will see in practice and builds upon the core pathological concepts provided in General Pathology (BHS201A). This subject address the morphology, aetiology and underlying general principles operating in disease states in the neurological, musculoskeletal and integumentary systems, in addition to select disease states in the endocrine and pulmonary systems.   An introduction to the currently used laboratory diagnostic methods that would inform diagnosis of conditions in a general practise is also included in this subject.

This subject is a key component in the education of a Clinical Myotherapist, as it provides knowledge of the various disease states that will be seen in practice, and correlates these disease states at a cellular and gross anatomical level with clinical signs and symptoms.

 
CMY209A Exercise Prescription 1

Exercise Prescription 1 is a practice and theory based class which provides an introduction to the foundations and principals of exercise prescription. The student will learn to safely and effectively prescribe exercise as a therapeutic approach to patient management in a supervised and feedback rich learning environment.  Looking at a range of patient presentations students will explore suitable and appropriate exercises, their application and therapeutic technique.

 
CMY210A Myofascial Dry Needling 2

Myofascial Dry Needling 2 provides the student with further knowledge on myofascial trigger points and their associated pain patterns and further develops skills in dry-needling techniques.  The focus is on muscles of the torso and lower body.  Clinical Health Management provides the student with the ability to put together a Clinical Myotherapy treatment from history taking to assessment, diagnosis, treatment and management, and provides a platform for their future Clinical Practicum subjects.  Due to the practical nature of this class, students are given ongoing feedback on their techniques and application during class.

 
CMY211A Pain Management 2

Pain Management 2 (CMY211A) builds on the concepts learned in Pain management 1 (CMY207A) and gives the students comprehensive information about the assessment, treatment, diagnosis and evidence based management of pain and movement disorders affecting the lower body. At the completion of Pain Management 2, students will be able to demonstrate an in-depth understanding of clinical signs and symptoms, differential diagnosis, and evidence based decision making regarding management interventions used in clinical myotherapy practice.

 
CMY212A Clinical Assessment 3

Clinical Assessment 3 provides the student with the theoretical knowledge and practical skills required to perform a comprehensive musculoskeletal and neurological assessment of the spine, sacro-iliac joint and TMJ. Emphasis will be placed on students being able to critically analyse assessment methods based on current literature and research. Students work in pairs practicing assessment skills on each other under close supervision.

 
BHS303A Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology

Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology comprises a study of basic principles of pharmacology, the pharmacokinetics of drugs commonly used in medical practice and common drug – drug and drug-myotherapy treatment strategy interactions.  Drugs for pain, inflammation, psychological functions, cancer, infection and the cardiovascular, respiratory, gastrointestinal, reproductive and endocrine systems are discussed.

This subject examines drug actions, uses, contraindications, adverse effects and interactions, together with implications for myotherapy treatment strategies. Musculoskeletal Integrative Pharmacology is crucial for the modern myotherapy practitioner to understand common medications that clients may be taking and common interactions between these medications and treatments as well as medications that support myotherapy treatment strategies.  This subject also emphasizes the need for clear lines of communication and common language between doctors and myotherapy practitioners in order to obtain the best health outcomes for clients.

 
CMY311A Joint Mobilisation

Joint Mobilisation brings together the theory and practical approaches to assessment and treatment. This passive movement technique is applied to a spinal or peripheral joint in which an oscillatory movement is performed within the control of the patient. This subject draws on the ‘concept’ of treatment as developed by G. Maitland in which factors such as clinical reasoning, examination and evaluation are applied to the role of mobilisation in the management of musculoskeletal disorders.

 
CMY303A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 1

Myotherapy clinical practicum 1 is an introduction to working in a clinical setting at our on campus student clinic. Under the close supervision and monitoring of an experienced practitioner students will consult and treat patient’s injuries or conditions. Student clinic is the integration of practical and theoretical learning so far and provides an opportunity to formulate and implement evidenced based and relevant treatment plans. Ethical and medico-legal responsibilities inherent in the practitioner-patient relationship are a core aspect of clinical practice.

 
CMY304A Exercise Prescription 2

This subject expands and builds on the herbal disciplinary knowledge presented in Pharmacology 1 (CMP208) and 2 (CMP301). This subject aims to introduce theory of developing formulae and examines in detail the composition, actions and main therapeutic applications of approximately 120 major formulae. The depth of study may vary depending on the importance of the formulae and their frequency of use. Emphasis is upon the principles of composition, principle of modification, methods of preparation, administration of the herbs, actions, main therapeutic applications and any cautions or contraindications of traditional Chinese herbal formulae. Also included is an in-depth study of the comparisons and contrasts relating to formulae within a similar therapeutic category and the function of herbs both singularly and as a synergistic component within the formula.

 
CMY306A Pain Management 3

Pain Management 3 (CMY306A) explores the field of chronic pain in relation to biopsychosocial mechanisms within a multidisciplinary framework. This subject builds on knowledge gained from Neuroscience, Pain Management 2 and Musculoskeletal Pathology in order to understand and appreciate the many dimensions of pain in complex chronic pain conditions. This subject explores evidence based treatment and management strategies and their role in chronic pain management.

 
CMY307A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 2

Clinical Practicum 2, builds on experience gained in Clinical Practicum 1 integrating new information to further develop clinical reasoning and evidenced based treatment approaches.

Under the close supervision and monitoring of an experienced practitioner students will consult and treat patient’s injuries or conditions. Student clinic is the integration of practical and theoretical learning so far and provides an opportunity to formulate and implement evidenced based and relevant treatment plans. Ethical and medico‐legal responsibilities inherent in the practitioner‐patient relationship are a core aspect of clinical practice.

 
CMY305A Critical Literature Review

In this subject students write a literature review on a topic of their choice, which must examine a clinical aspect of their specialty. The emphasis is on presenting and critically evaluating current literature by searching for and appraising the literature, and writing a clear and fully referenced literature review. Students will be expected to present a proposal early in the trimester, and a full literature review by the end of the trimester.

 
CMY309A Neuropsychology

Neuropsychology explores the psychological aspects of pain and the psychological considerations linked to pain management.  Students will develop their understanding and explore  the  environmental dimensions and biopsychological aspects of pain, and the relationship to psychological issues.   Health behaviour  models,  mental  health  issues  and  the  role  of  social  and  occupational  factors  in  pain management will also be key elements of learning.

 
CMY310A Myotherapy Clinical Practicum 3

Clinical practicum 3 is the final student clinic and builds on the clinical practice of practicum 1 & 2. Supervised by an experienced clinician students will draw on aspects of their theoretical and practical studies to assess, diagnose, manage and refer patients within the student clinic environment. Formulating and implementing evidence based treatment and pain management strategies and critically reflecting on clinical effectiveness is a key learning outcome.

 
BHS401A Professional Practice

Professional Practice comprises the basic skills needed for the operation and management of a complementary healthcare practice and provides an understanding of the legal and ethical requirements that are pertinent to the complementary healthcare practitioner. This subject explores business strategies including operating policy and procedures, marketing and networking strategies, leadership duties and administrative and financial issues.  Also included in this subject is ethical conduct, liability, legal and regulatory topics.

 

Elective Subjects

HWEL2009 – Active Ageing and Falls Prevention

The problem of falls is a significant global issue and can result in injury, hospitalisation, loss of independence, social isolation, depression, poor health status, institutionalism and death. The World Health Organisation identify falls as occurring as a result of complex interrelationships between biological, behavioural, environmental and socioeconomic risk factors. With the predicted costs of falls expected to increase exponentially as our population ages there is a need for effective preventive strategies such as active ageing programs. This subject examines these complexities of ageing, where students will learn to assess falls risk and develop effective prevention strategies that promote wellbeing in ageing populations.

HWEL2010 Corporate Health

The occupational environment plays an important role in combating or promoting the rise of chronic disease and disability. This environment has the capacity to affect the physical, psychological, economic and social well-being of workers’ and thus, proper attention to workers’ health offers vast opportunities for workers and employers alike. In this subject students will explore evidence linking worker health and wellbeing to organizational health and business performance. Specific analysis for business needs will be considered, with practical interventions designed to educate and enhance the occupational environment.

FHN201 Foundations of Human Nutrition

This subject provides students with fundamental nutrition knowledge through examining the relationship between food, nutrition and human health.  Students will learn about macro and micro-nutrition, dietary guidelines, role of nutrition in metabolism, health maintenance and disease, nutrient rich food sources, and the specific nutritional requirements throughout the lifespan. Students will also learn how to identify and construct a healthy diet according to specific dietary guidelines, and know the impact of nutritional deficiency and excess as they relate to health and disease.

SEN301 Social Enterprise

Social Enterprise is an exciting theoretically-based subject that is driven by the desire to create positive change through entrepreneurial activities. These activities harness design thinking and problem-solving processes in the realisation of pragmatic, viable project proposals from initiation to client presentation.

By providing students with a framework to understand business model generation and the skills to source, evaluate, and measure opportunities through systematic research and competitor analysis, Social Enterprise empowers students to conceptualise, develop and propose new ventures and products that focus primarily upon social change for good. In addition, this subject will help students understand and address the practical challenges of working within this environment; to analyse different entrepreneurial business strategies, to explore diverse funding strategies, as well as incorporate theoretical discussions on major trends and issues in the social economy. Social Enterprise enables students to appreciate the power of creativity in problem-solving and the importance of the designer’s role in making a difference and precipitating change.

CMY301A Lifespan Myotherapy

Lifespan Myotherapy provides students with the knowledge of how to treat musculoskeletal pain that is relevant to paediatric and geriatric patients as well as in-depth knowledge on contraindications/precautions and acceptable treatments for pre and post-natal patients. This subject also provides students with knowledge about the impact of illness/injury/pain on quality of life. It incorporates theory on the history and efficacy of CAM and traditional remedies. Information relating to disease-specific population groups, as well as indigenous health issues and cultural implications for treatment will be incorporated.

CMY312A Sports Injury Management

Sports Injury Management builds upon the clinical skills of assessment and treatment, with specific application to the athletic populations. This subject provides students with the underpinning theory and a range of practical skills to work in the sporting environment and support the prevention and management of common sporting injuries.

Professionalism, ethics and responsibilities are addressed, along with emergency action planning and on-field trauma management skills. Students will learn to apply evidence based and clinically reasoned decisions in sport specific return-to-play scenarios, and gain the practical skills to support return to play including taping and pre-game athlete support.

Students will be expected to complete clinical placement hours with a sporting club either previously or concurrently with this elective to support learning. Assistance to find placements will be provided.

*Elective options are subject to availability

Locations

The Bachelor of Health Science (Clinical Myotherapy) can be studied partially online and is delivered at:

  • Fitzroy campus (Melbourne)

Campus Facilities and Services

All campuses are designed to provide students with professional spaces in which to learn and work. They

have been planned with student study needs in mind with well-equipped accessible learning spaces as well as student breakout areas for group work and spending time with friends.

Facilities and Services include:

  • The Customer Service Hub – our friendly and experienced staff can give help and advice about courses, your enrolment and campus life, including all services and activities on ca
  • Counsellors are available for students to consult with on a range of personal issues
  • Student wireless access throughout the Campus
  • Student break-out and relaxed study spaces for group work
  • Student lounge areas – most with microwaves, fridge and kitchenette facilities
  • The Learning Hub, home to the Learning Support Team, encompasses Learning Skills Advisors, Learning Technology Advisors, and Library & Learning Skills Offi It provides an integrated, holistic support program for students throughout the study lifecycle within a library/collaborative study environment.
  • Support and workshops with highly qualified staff in the areas of Academic skills, Library skills, and

Technology skills, both on campus and online.

  • Physical and digital resources relevant to studies, such as books, journals, multimedia, databases
  • Self-check kiosks for library loans and print and copy facilities

Practice Experience at the Practice Wellbeing Centre:

The Clinic is a real-life, multi-modality clinic serving the needs of the surrounding communities.  The clinics are custom built with modern practice technology including body composition analysis and iridology technology.  You will treat real patients, work with a professional clinic team, gain experience in all aspects of working in, and running your own clinical practice, and engage with real clients in a safe and supervised environment.  This will prepare you to confidently and successfully practice in the community.

In the time you spend in clinic you will undergo a transformation from theoretical student to graduate practitioner, all under the expert supervision of some of Australia’s best clinicians.

The Practice Wellbeing Centre is located in the vibrant area of Fitzroy, in Melbourne.

Students enrol at SSNT because they want to become expert practitioners and The Wellbeing Clinic at Fitzroy campus provides the perfect hands on teaching environment to hone your craft. The Clinic is a real-life, multi-modality clinic serving the needs of the surrounding communities.  You will treat real patients, and work with a professional clinic team, gaining experience in all aspects of working in, and running your own clinical practice, engaging with real clients in a safe and supervised environment. In the year or more you will spend in clinic, you will undergo a transformation from theoretical student to graduate practitioner, all under the expert supervision of some of Australia’s best clinicians.

Clinical Industry Placement

In addition to the time spent in the Wellbeing Clinic, students complete external clinical placement throughout their study.

This requires the completion of observation and practice hours under the supervision of clinicians in practice and recorded by a reflective log as part of an e-portfolio that builds as evidence experience throughout the degree. The time spent in the workplace environment is invaluable to the advancement of a student’s technical skills and professional development, allowing for further application, understanding and reflection in clinical practice on a variety of subjects.

A positive student experience

Southern School of Natural Therapies values the importance of a positive student experience, and therefore has robust processes to resolve student complaints.  The Student Complaints Policy, and associated procedures, can be accessed from the website .

Paying for your qualification

We offer two payment options for this course:

  • Upfront payment

If you want to complete your qualification debt-free, you can choose to pay as you go. This means tuition fees will be invoiced each semester and payment is required on or before the due date using EFTPOS, credit card or direct transfer.

  • FEE-HELP

FEE-HELP is Australian Government’s loan scheme for higher education degree courses. It can assist you in paying for all, or part of, your course fees. Repayments commence via the tax system once your income rises above a minimum threshold ($45, 881 in 2019-20). Just like with any other debt,
a FEE-HELP debt is a real debt that impacts your credit rating.

Further information about FEE-HELP, including eligibility, is available at:

Austudy and Abstudy

Students enrolled in this course may be eligible for government assistance, such as Austudy or Abstudy.